Bald Eagles in the Columbia River Gorge

Bald Eagles in a strong wind, in a snag along the Columbia River near Lyle, Washington.  Photo by Darlisa Black, of Starlisa Black Photography.  February, 2014

Bald Eagles in a strong wind, in a snag along the Columbia River near Lyle, Washington. Photo by Darlisa Black, of Starlisa Black Photography. February, 2014.  Click on this image to see in my fine art galleries or to Order Prints.  

 

Some information from Wikipedia

“The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalushali = sea, aeetus = eagleleuco= white, cephalis = head) is a bird of prey found in North America. A sea eagle, it has two known sub-species and forms a species pair with the White-tailed Eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla). Its range includes most of Canada and Alaska, all of the contiguous United States, and northern Mexico. It is found near large bodies of open water with an abundant food supply and old-growth trees for nesting.

The Bald Eagle is an opportunistic feeder which subsists mainly on fish, which it swoops down and snatches from the water with its talons. It builds the largestnest of any North American bird and the largest tree nests ever recorded for any animal species, up to 4 m (13 ft) deep, 2.5 m (8.2 ft) wide, and 1 metric ton (1.1short tons) in weight.[2] Sexual maturity is attained at the age of four to five years.

Bald Eagles are not actually bald; the name derives from an older meaning of “white headed”. The adult is mainly brown with a white head and tail. The sexes are identical in plumage, but females are about 25 percent larger than males. The beak is large and hooked. The plumage of the immature is brown.

The Bald Eagle is both the national bird and national animal of the United States of America. The Bald Eagle appears on its Seal. In the late 20th century it was on the brink of extirpation in the continental United States. Populations recovered and the species was removed from the U.S. federal government’s list of endangered species on July 12, 1995 and transferred to the list of threatened species. It was removed from the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife in the Lower 48 States on June 28, 2007.”

There are now more overwintering Eagles in the Columbia River Gorge of Oregon and Washington and it is a delight to count as many as 40-50 Eagles in a day on occasion.

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