Pink Morning Lennies

Mount Adams glowed with a lovely pre-sunrise pink and blue deliciousness that pulled me out of bed after only 3 hours of sleep, to stumble outside with camera in hand. By the time the sunrise kissed the mountain top, the pink had gotten brilliant. I was staying in Glenwood,  Washington, where I have a wonderful view of Mount Adams from my friends house.

These are only iPhone pics, but I really wanted to share now! The color is not quite as brilliant as my eyes were seeing.  This is an unusual event; typically the lenticular clouds more often are seen far ro the right of the mountain from this location.  Last night between 8:15 and 8:38 pm we had roaring sudden gusts of 40 mph winds, which dropped to 30 mph gusts for the next hour.  Base winds ranged roughly from 8-15 mph, fluctuating BETWEEN GUSTS from the SW to SE, and back to SSW. Temps at that time were 44 deg. F.  This morning it was below freezing and I ran out without my gloves 😂💕  Oops

May your day be blessed.

~Darlisa Black

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FebruMay Day

ahhh, the wildflowers are blooming like crazy… they didn’t get the memo about winter being here until late March!
Catherine Creek Universal Access Area along Old Highway 8 near Lyle, WA is a wonderful ever changing place when spring hits… even if spring comes in February.  Recent walks out around the paved handicap access trail in the sunshine that had a sharp bit of cold bite led to the discovery of fields of Grass Widows blooming, along with saxifrage varieties, Gold Stars, Prairie Stars, Columbia (purple) Desert Parsley as well as the yellow Desert Parsley.  Pretty exciting!  I will do another post soon with the wildflower closeups, but for this one i wanted to focus on this amazing beautiful day, February 22, 2015

For More information on the wildflower called Grass Widows click here

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Bald Eagles in the Columbia River Gorge

Bald Eagles in a strong wind, in a snag along the Columbia River near Lyle, Washington.  Photo by Darlisa Black, of Starlisa Black Photography.  February, 2014

Bald Eagles in a strong wind, in a snag along the Columbia River near Lyle, Washington. Photo by Darlisa Black, of Starlisa Black Photography. February, 2014.  Click on this image to see in my fine art galleries or to Order Prints.  

 

Some information from Wikipedia

“The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalushali = sea, aeetus = eagleleuco= white, cephalis = head) is a bird of prey found in North America. A sea eagle, it has two known sub-species and forms a species pair with the White-tailed Eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla). Its range includes most of Canada and Alaska, all of the contiguous United States, and northern Mexico. It is found near large bodies of open water with an abundant food supply and old-growth trees for nesting.

The Bald Eagle is an opportunistic feeder which subsists mainly on fish, which it swoops down and snatches from the water with its talons. It builds the largestnest of any North American bird and the largest tree nests ever recorded for any animal species, up to 4 m (13 ft) deep, 2.5 m (8.2 ft) wide, and 1 metric ton (1.1short tons) in weight.[2] Sexual maturity is attained at the age of four to five years.

Bald Eagles are not actually bald; the name derives from an older meaning of “white headed”. The adult is mainly brown with a white head and tail. The sexes are identical in plumage, but females are about 25 percent larger than males. The beak is large and hooked. The plumage of the immature is brown.

The Bald Eagle is both the national bird and national animal of the United States of America. The Bald Eagle appears on its Seal. In the late 20th century it was on the brink of extirpation in the continental United States. Populations recovered and the species was removed from the U.S. federal government’s list of endangered species on July 12, 1995 and transferred to the list of threatened species. It was removed from the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife in the Lower 48 States on June 28, 2007.”

There are now more overwintering Eagles in the Columbia River Gorge of Oregon and Washington and it is a delight to count as many as 40-50 Eagles in a day on occasion.

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Magnificent Ice Formations

Weeping Wall drips with ice at Bonneville Hotsprings resort on February 5, 2014

A day at the Bonneville Hot Springs Resort with my friend Cheryl brought wonderful much-needed muscle relaxation, and photo opportunities before the visit to the resort.  This lovely weeping wall covered with ice caught my attention on the way in, and called for a pause for taking pictures.

A Weeping Wall created fanciful shapes of ice at Bonneville Hotsprings resort on February 5, 2014

A Weeping Wall created fanciful shapes of ice at Bonneville Hotsprings resort on February 5, 2014

 

Ice from the Weeping wall at Bonneville Hotsprings resort covers every nearby surface with rounded shimmery borbules of ice on February 5, 2014

Ice from the Weeping wall at Bonneville Hot springs resort covers every nearby surface with rounded shimmery borbules of ice on February 5, 2014

Ice from the Weeping wall at Bonneville Hotsprings resort covers every nearby surface with rounded shimmery borbules of ice on February 5, 2014

Ice from the Weeping wall at Bonneville Hot Springs resort covers every nearby surface with long spears of ice on February 5, 2014

Ice from the Weeping wall at Bonneville Hotsprings resort covers every nearby surface with rounded shimmery borbules of ice on February 5, 2014

Ice from the Weeping wall at Bonneville Hot Springs resort covers every nearby surface with long delicate spears of ice on February 5, 2014

 

 

 

Ice from the Weeping wall at Bonneville Hotsprings resort covers every nearby surface with rounded shimmery borbules of ice on February 5, 2014

Ice from the Weeping wall at Bonneville Hot Springs resort covers every nearby surface with rounded shimmery borbules and long delicate spears of ice on February 5, 2014

 

Ice from the Weeping wall at Bonneville Hotsprings resort covers every nearby surface with rounded shimmery borbules of ice on February 5, 2014

Ice from the Weeping wall at Bonneville Hot Springs resort covers every nearby surface with long spears of ice on February 5, 2014

Tonight in White Salmon we have 4-6 inches of snow and still coming down, so now the ice will be all covered with little caps of snow!  I must go do some shoveling now… sigh.  My sister has to get out for Dialysis in the morning, and cannot miss that.

Thanks for visiting… and if you are in the area during February or March you can come see my large photo display at North Shore Cafe at 166 E. Jewett White Salmon, WA 98672 right on the main street through town, highway 141.

My images are all my own, and are copyrighted.  Many of them when clicked on take you to the higher quality image on my SmugMug gallery where you can purchase prints.  For Metal or Canvas prints, use this contact form to email me, or for comments use the regular comment box at the bottom of the page.  I do licence images for many uses as well, just ask…  and see my About the Photographer page in the menu bar to the right.

 

 

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