Fire Danger Conditions

When conditions are as dry as they are now, fires can be ignited extremely easily, from a surprisingly wide range of sources. Any metal-to-metal friction can create a spark; vehicle exhaust systems (especially the catalytic converters, which must be hot to work properly) can easily ignite dry brush; oily rags can spontaneously ignite; the heat generated by organic decomposition can make compost piles highly combustible; glass or metal objects can focus sunlight to a high enough temperature to burn a wide range of combustibles; and then of course there is human carelessness and irresponsible behavior. It pays to not only be careful, but also be keenly aware of the many things that can ignite fires. And to the extent we can, provide water to lawns, shrubs, and trees, so that they can be more resistant to fires and ignition sources.

Credit to Daniel West

Remember, if you think you see smoke and you’re not sure about it call 911 and tell dispatch.

  • Driving in dry grass
  • Glass bottle in dry grass in the sun
  • Chain hanging from vehicle hitting pavement
  • Oily rags in a hot location
  • Bad spark arrester on your motor.
  • And so much more!

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Chicken Coop Fire

Happy Thanksgiving!  I am grateful that this fire was kept from spreading to my brother’s house and garage, and that no one was hurt, not even the chickens!

Our awesome local firefighters came to the rescue last night, and although the fire at my brother’s (Boyce Black) turned out to be just the Chicken Coop, the chickens survived by escaping to the pen in back (so you are stuck with the Turkeys for dinner today). The coop burned up but they kept it from spreading to the very nearby shop/garage. The event was extremely well attended, there were so many flashing lights it looked like a circus! Young firefighters in training had the opportunity to practice their skills and learn more things. THank you to all of you for your hard work and fast response, and thank you to some neighbors who called it in. No one was home at the time. It is theorized the fire started from a light on an extension cord left on to keep the chickens warm.

Air Support on Wildfires

Trout Lake, Wa has been home for nearly a month to a large Fire Camp and Helitack crew, during the Cascade Creek Fire on Mount Adams, with several Helicopters coming and going. My brother’s house is right behind the airstrip which lodges the Helitack camp, and I enjoy watching these birds of the air coming and going. To us, the noise of the machines is simply telling us we are safe from that fire burning 8 + miles away.

During the Salt Spring Fire of (2005?), the Cold Springs Fire of 2008, the Crofton Ridge Fire of 2009, and now this one in 2012 there were many different Helicopters coming and going. This is a sampling of some of them, and I have many more shots I simply have not gotten around to processing. enjoy!

If you are interested in owning any of my prints or cards, any size or material, or my Fire calendars and books from this fire (limited edition) simply email me at starlisa.black@gmail.com for more information or contact me on my facebook page in the sidebar to the left. You can also see links to the left for my other local scenery photo books that are available.

Update on the Cascade Creek Fire on Mount Adams

Update on the Cascade Creek Fire on Mount Adams.

This is Dorina, she makes the Fire T-Shirts, Hoodies and Beanies, and they are lovely, very popular among the firefighters!

this is the camp entrance, located in Hollenbeck Park in Trout Lake, Washington

Update on the Cascade Creek Fire on Mount Adams

The fire took off again the last few days, and is now up to well over 11,500 acres with a new run to the Northwest along Stagman Ridge in a narrow finger of fire reaching around the west side of the Mountain. More information can be seen here on the  InciwebLink

UPDATE 9-23-2012: Now up to 13,727 acres, holding strong on the South and East boundaries and expanding to the Northwest along Stagman ridge, across Looking Glass Lake and another pretty lake with an island… and crawling down the slopes of the western foothills in the direction of Forest road 23. Containment still at 50%. Many of the crews are ending their 14 day rotations and heading out this weekend, with new crews coming in to take over Monday.

I have been busy making fire calendars and cards and selling them at the Fire camp, and having wonderful interesting conversations with some of these amazing men and women of all ages who work incredibly hard long hours out on the lines, and driving watertrucks and supply drops, and managing resources. I have a great deal of respect for them!

The calendar is a 2013 spriral bound calendar with many images from this collection or the previous post, and the calendar costs $25.00. I can ship them for an extra $6.00 and can take payments via check or paypal or moneyorder. My email is starlisa.black@gmail.com
Prints are also available, as well as metal prints and there is a pricelist in a link in the sidebar.

Here are more photos of the fire and the views through smoke

Cascade Creek Fire on Mount Adams

September 8, 2012 while the Highway 141 fire near White Salmon was beginning to wind down, a Lightning storm swept through the area and started at least 40 wildfires in Washington and another large amount in Oregon.  Some of the fires were put out quickly, but others like the one on the south side of Mount Adams 9 miles out of Trout Lake continues to grow. Smoke fills the valley making it hard on locals with allergies and asthma. 

Most of this fire is in the Wilderness area, and much of what is burning is dead diseased trees that have accumulated in recent years creating a dangerous situation.  In reality the fire, while deadly to slower moving wildlife, will in the long run provide a much needed cleansing in the forests.  When we thought we were saving the trees by stopping all forest fires and cutting in our wildernesses, we actually created a tinderbox waiting to burn!   In the natural scheme of things, fires caused by lightning provided an important function in the Wilderness, clearing out diseases and pests, opening up space for new growth, and in the case of Lodgepole Pine providing the catalyst needed to open the cones and prepare the seeds for growing.  Sadly, at this point things have gone too far and now a fire causes a great deal more harm on the way to creating good!

In any case, We have an awesome crew of Fire personnel at work in Trout Lake and the forest hard at work in containing the fire and keeping Trout Lake Valley safe.  I slept in my tent near the airfield for a couple days at my brother Roger’s place, and the sound of the helicopters coming and going was actually comforting, knowing they were working to protect us. 

 

This first image was on the first evening of the fire, in Trout Lake at the School.

 

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The inciweb site below is updated daily, and an afternoon update today had some good news about the cars trapped by the fire.  Unfortunately a few days ago 2 of the cars left at Morrison Creek camp were torched… another one had melted paint and such and a 4th was untouched. 

todays update in part:

“1700 Hr Update: 10 cars were brought down from the South Climb trailhead to a safety zone where they will not be burned. Increased fire activity prevented moving them all the way down. Chances are good that they can be brought down to base camp tomorrow. The fire was active today, but no major runs.

 

FIRE STATUS & RESOURCES

Sunday, September 16, 2012

Acres Burned: 6,467

Cause: Lightning

Containment: 4%

Total Personnel: 578

Serious Injuries: None

Crews: 17

Engines: 7

Dozers: 6

Water Tenders: 14

Helicopters: 5″

Inciweb Link 

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